Archetypal Panpsychism: Whitehead, Jung, & Hillman

If you happen to live near Boise, Becca and I will travel there in January to give a weekend workshop for the Idaho Friends of Jung. January 20-21, 2017 Archetypal Panpsychism:  Whitehead, Jung, and Hillman A presentation by Matthew D. Segall, PhD, & Becca Tarnas, ABD Friday Lecture, 7:00 – 9:00 PM; Saturday Workshop, 10:00 AM – [...]

New Online Masters Degree in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness

CIIS is accepting applications for the Fall 2017 semester for a new online masters degree program in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness with concentrations in Archetypal Cosmology, Integral Ecology, and Process Philosophy. I'll be teaching mostly in the Process Philosophy Concentration. Check out the website for more information.    

Archai: The Journal of Archetypal Cosmology

Archai: The Journal of Archetypal Cosmology just relaunched. Issue 5 will be out next month, which includes an essay by me called “Minding Time in an Archetypal Cosmos” based on this talk.

 

Becca Tarnas

Archai

We in the Northern Hemisphere find ourselves in the heart of the darkest time of year, the Solstice—from the Latin solstitium, when the Sun stands still. Tonight we enter the longest night, when the stars are visible across the sky for the greatest number of hours each year.

At this time when the stars are longest open to our gaze, we are pleased to announce the return of Archai: The Journal of Archetypal Cosmology. Founded in 2008, Archai is an academic journal originally edited by Keiron Le Grice, Rod O’Neal, and Bill Streett—all alumni of PCC. Four issues of the journal were published from 2009 to 2012, defining the discipline of archetypal cosmology and the theoretical foundations of the subject. Keiron, Rod, and Bill have decided to step back from their editorial duties to focus on other commitments, and we would like to acknowledge the great service they…

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Minding Time: Chronos, Kairos, and Aion in an Archetypal Cosmos

Notes for a brief talk I gave today at CIIS. [Update (July 15, 2016): This talk was expanded into an article published in Archai: The Journal of Archetypal Cosmology] ............................................................................................  “…what is time? Who can give that a brief or easy answer? Who can even form a conception of it to be put into words? Yet [...]

Entheogens and Cosmos, the sequel [a lecture for ERIE @ CIIS this Sunday on psychedelics and the extended mind thesis]

The Entheogenic Research, Integration, and Education student group at the California Institute of Integral Studies has invited me to speak again about the philosophical, cosmological, and psychological significance of psychedelics. In case you missed it, here is my first talk for ERIE back in September called "The Psychedelic Eucharist--toward a pharmacological philosophy of religion": I attempted to link Plato [...]

Solstice Prayer from Dec. 21st, 2014

The photo is from last summer's Burning Man festival, taken by Zipporah on Sunday morning while I sat in the Temple of Grace contemplating my life's loves and losses. Later that night, the Temple collapsed in upon itself like a curtsying ballerina after burning for fifteen short minutes. ....... I read the following prayer at the opening of a small medicine ceremony I [...]

Love, Death, and the Sub-Creative Imagination in J.R.R. Tolkien (revised)

Love, Death, and the Sub-Creative Imagination in J. R. R. Tolkien Written March 3, 2013, Revised September 20, 2014 by Matthew David Segall In the year 1951, as recorded by the calendar of our world, J.R.R. Tolkien wrote to a potential publisher of his Lord of the Rings trilogy to describe the origin of his [...]

More on Latour and Tarnas – Networks, Technology, and the Transformation of Western Culture

Grant Maxwell has responded to my reflections on Richard Tarnas, Bruno Latour, and the Re-Enchantment Project. Grant wonders what I meant by referring to Tarnas' archetypal cosmology as a "middle up" approach to transforming culture, and to Latour's anthropology of the moderns as a "top down" approach to the same. I appreciate Grant's use of Latour's own network [...]